Trilogy, the investment and development business founded by Robert Wolstenholme, has appointed Max Natalini as chief operating officer and Mike Pashley as chief financial officer.

Natalini joins from Pillar Ventures, the property arm of digital venture builder Blenheim Chalcot, where he was director. He previously worked for private equity investors Warburg Pincus, Apollo Real Estate Advisors, having started his career at JPMorgan in the real estate investment banking team.

Pashley is a chartered accountant and was European finance director for 17 years with AREA Property Partners, which was acquired by ARES in 2013.

The move sees Trilogy Property Limited become Trilogy Real Estate LLP, a partnership with a 12-strong teamoffering such services as asset management, place making, deal analysis and finance.

Wolstenholme, Natalini and Pashley will lead Trilogy’s drive to acquire new opportunities to reposition tired assets to create contemporary workplaces and mixed-use schemes. The company is seeking to deploy up to £300m of equity on assets of between £20m and £50m.

It will focus on the London fringe and prime regional cities, adding to its existing portfolio in these locations. Current Trilogy schemes include Republic at London’s East India Dock with investors LaSalle Investment Management; and Great Northern Warehouse in central Manchester, backed by Peterson Group of Hong Kong.

Trilogy’s collaborators include designer Tom Hingston of Hingston Studio, whose clients have included Dior, Alexander McQueen, David Bowie and the Rolling Stones; and Andrew Hale, a brand strategist and BAFTA-winning musician. Trilogy has also worked with Nicholas Hytner and Nick Starr on the development of a new theatre near Tower Bridge for the London Theatre Company.

Robert Wolstenholme said: “Max and Mike bring extensive experience in private equity real estate, to complement Trilogy’s strength in unlocking value from unloved assets through creative repositioning. We are now actively seeking built assets or joint-ventures, where transformational mixed-use schemes can respond to fast-moving trends in work, retail and leisure.”

 

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